Gabriel Bulliot

A wine trader who was passionate about his region’s history, Gabriel Bulliot identified Mont Beuvray (Saône-et-Loire) as the site of the ancient Bibracte, the capital of the Aedui people.

© Centre Archéologique européen de Bibracte

A wine trader, non-resident member of the CTHS and president of the Société éduenne des lettres, sciences et arts in Autun, Jacques-Gabriel Bulliot was appointed a correspondent of the Commission de Topographie des Gaules (CTG) in 1865.

The excavator of Mont Beuvray

Passionate about his region’s history, Gabriel Bulliot identified Mont Beuvray (Saône-et-Loire) as the site of the ancient Bibracte, the capital of the Aedui people. From 1866, the CTG regularly gave him funding for his work. Between 1867 and 1895 he undertook many excavations, before stepping down and leaving his work to his nephew Joseph Déchelette.

From 1869 to 1875, Gabriel Bulliot sent the musée gallo-romain some of the material he discovered, often given officially by Napoleon III or the CTG.